top of page
  • ahwcweb

Reverse Blood Pressure Naturally



Monday, we shared with you Eli Vega's story of reversing his high blood pressure naturally?

The University of Rochester Medical Center posted the following Blood Pressure Quiz, and the Answers follow. Take a few minutes to see how you fair with your BP Knowledge by taking the quiz and comparing your answers to the answer sheet.

(Source: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=40&ContentID=BloodPressureDiastolQuiz)


Blood Pressure Quiz

Do you know your risk factors for high blood pressure? You can’t do anything about some risk factors. But other risk factors can be changed. Learn about the risk factors for high blood pressure by taking this quiz.

1. At what age should you have your first screening for high blood pressure?

A. 16

B. 18

C. 30

D. 50


2. The numbers in a blood pressure reading:

A. Vary, depending on the time of day your blood pressure is checked

B. Get lower with high levels of stress

C. Are the same for people of the same age and weight

D. Stay the same throughout the day


3. What is the most common symptom of high blood pressure?

A. Racing heartbeat

B. High body temperature

C. Fatigue

D. It has no symptoms that you notice


4. Which of these can increase your risk of high blood pressure?

A. Obesity

B. A family history of high blood pressure

C. Smoking

D. All of the above


5. At what point is blood pressure considered "high"?

A. 120 over 80

B. 130 over 80

C. 140 over 90

D. 210 over 120


6. High blood pressure is the main cause of which of these?

A. Cancer

B. Strokes

C. Diabetes

D. Congestive heart failure


7. Which of these contribute to high blood pressure?

A. Getting a lot of vitamin C

B. Drinking a lot of alcohol

C. Getting a lot of calcium

D. All of the above


8. In which age group of men does the risk for high blood pressure go up?

A. 40 to 49

B. 50 to 59

C. 60 to 69

D. 70 to 79


9. Why does reducing how much salt you eat help prevent high blood pressure?

A. It reduces fluid buildup in the body

B. It allows vessels to relax

C. It raises levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol

D. It helps keep your heartbeat steady


10. What can you do to control high blood pressure?

A. Get to and stay at a healthy weight

B. Exercise regularly

C. Stop all nicotine, alcohol and caffeine use

D. All of the above


Blood Pressure Quiz Answer Sheet

1. At what age should you have your first screening for high blood pressure?

The correct answer is B. 18.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that a healthy adult get a first blood pressure check at age 18. If your blood pressure is normal at that time, and you do not have diabetes or other risk factors, you should then get your blood pressure checked every 3 to 5 years after that. Once you reach age 40, you should be checked every year. You should also be checked more often if you are younger and at risk for high blood pressure. Your healthcare provider may suggest a different screening schedule if you have other health conditions.

2. The numbers in a blood pressure reading:

The correct answer is A. Vary, depending on the time of day your blood pressure is checked.

Blood pressure readings measure the force of blood pushing against blood vessel (artery) walls as your heart pumps blood. They can change when you are dehydrated, nervous, or stressed. They can also change when you sleep, and when you wake up. They also change when you are active. Blood pressure goes up as you get older. It is also related to your body size. When blood pressure stays high over time, it can cause damage to different parts of the body. It can cause serious long-term problems.

3. What is the most common symptom of high blood pressure?

The correct answer is D. It has no symptoms that you notice.

Because it usually has no obvious symptoms, high blood pressure (hypertension) is called the silent killer.

4. Which of these can increase your risk of high blood pressure?

The correct answer is D. All of the above.

A direct cause isn't known in most cases, however.

5. At what point is blood pressure considered "high"?

The correct answer is B. 130 over 80.

This reading (130 over 80) means stage one high blood pressure. A blood pressure of 120/80 to 129/80 is called prehypertension or elevated high blood pressure. Normal blood pressure is less than 120/80. If either the larger number (systolic) or smaller number (diastolic) is in one of the ranges listed above, that is the category that you are in. So, for example, if your blood pressure were 122/70 over time, your healthcare provider would say you have prehypertension. Stage two high blood pressure is 140 over 90.

6. High blood pressure is the main cause of which of these?

The correct answer is B. Strokes.

Over time, high blood pressure damages blood vessels. This damage is called arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis. These conditions increase your risk not only for stroke, but also heart attacks and kidney disease.

7. Which of these contribute to high blood pressure?

The correct answer is B. Drinking a lot of alcohol.

Excessive drinking increases heart rate. This puts pressure on vessel walls. Three to five drinks a day over a long period can cause high blood pressure.

8. In which age group of men does the risk for high blood pressure go up?

The correct answer is B. 50 to 59.

Aging directly relates to an increase in risk. Men tend to see their blood pressure go up in their 50s. Women's blood pressure tends to increase in their 60s.

9. Why does reducing how much salt you eat help prevent high blood pressure?

The correct answer is A. It reduces fluid buildup in the body.

People who are very sensitive to salt have blood pressure that reacts a lot to salt. The American Heart Association recommends that everyone--no matter what age, ethnic background, or health conditions--consume no more than 2,400 mg of sodium a day. In some cases, your healthcare provider may tell you to cut your sodium intake even more.

10. What can you do to control high blood pressure?

The correct answer is D. All of the above.

Although you can't change certain risk factors such as age and family health history, you can choose a lifestyle that promotes heart health.



What's your score? Would you like help reducing your BP naturally?


Comments


bottom of page